Hardness Test

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Hardness tests are also frequently called indentation tests. During these tests a tool is used to force an impression on the surface of the material; generally, one material is used to scratch another material or a series of materials. These tests are mostly done on metal or stone. Read More…

Hardness Test A hardness test is performed to determine the hardness of a material by examining how well it resists deformation. This information is beneficial because indentation hardness correlates linearly with tensile strength, which is a material's resistance to the force that tears it apart.

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West Conshohocken, PA  |  610-825-3310

For over 40 years, Strainsert Company has been an industry leader in manufacturing calibration services. Our goal is to provide calibrating services that are thorough and accurate, and we have experience serving a variety of applications. Our team of engineers can find a solution to your application, no matter how stringent your demands. Contact us today and let us know how we may assist you.

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Strainsert Company $$$

Elk Grove Village, IL  |  847-364-2600

Graftel maintains a complete calibration lab for gas flow, liquid flow, air velocity, RH/dew point and temperature. Calibration work is accredited to ISO 17025 and performed in compliance with ANSI/NSCL Z540-1-1994 requirements. Laboratory equipment is maintained in accordance with MIL-STD-45662A.

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North Olmsted, OH  |  440-343-4024

Caltech Service is a service company committed to customer satisfaction. We are an ISO 17025 accredited calibration service. All of our service technicians have over 30 years experience in the temperature process calibration field. By providing regularly scheduled service, we develop a detailed knowledge of a customer's control process, responding with expertise to any potential control problem.

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Grass Valley, CA  |  530-268-1860

Micro Precision develops and maintains calibration services and repair services that assure levels of accuracy for your T & ME and gage blocks to high-end electronics. We also have a calibration laboratory, software and pressure calibration to meet your needs. IS0 9001:2000, ISO 17025, NIST Traceability.

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Morristown, TN  |  866-521-3823

Total customer satisfaction is our promise here at Precision Calibration Systems. If you’re looking for fast and accurate calibration services, you’ve come to the right place. The scope of our capabilities includes analytical balance, caliper, digital thermometer, electrical measure, electrical source, hardness testers, micrometers and so much more. Contact us today!

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The results are compared and examined. Sometimes bending, scratching, cutting, abrasions or penetration is used to evaluate hardness as well. Hardness tests can be done manually by a worker using a sharp tool to gouge at the material's surface or it can be performed by a machine. Hardness cannot be automatically determined by calculating the fundamental units of mass, length and time. Instead, a hardness value is the result of a certain procedure that provides accurate responses instead of estimations. The Mohs Scale ranks materials on their ability to resist scratching by another material, one of the most common, basic and longest known techniques of taking a hardness test.

The results of hardness tests are used as basis for the comparison of materials, heat treatment, quality control and more. This is necessary knowledge for industrial and manufacturing companies to determine materials and specifications for parts and products.

Hardness Test Hardness Test - Inspec, Inc.

Hardness tests usually measure the depth or area of an indentation left by a tool of a specific shape with a certain force applied to it for a period of time. There are three main testing methods that use this basic procedure. One of the most common is the Rockwell hardness test which uses a small steel ball for soft material or a diamond cone for harder surfaces. The depth of penetration is measured automatically by the machine and displayed as a Rockwell hardness number.

Another widely used method is the Brinell test. It also uses a steel ball which averages 10 millimeters in diameter. The Brinell hardness number (BHN) is closely related to the tensile strength of the material; this test, like the Rockwell, is simple, fast and does not destroy the product being tested. The Vickers test can be a microhardness test; that is, the indentations made during the testing process are so small that a microscope is required to take a measurement. On the other hand, a macroindentation can be seen with the unaided eye.

The Vickers hardness test uses a triangular shaped tool to impress a pyramidal shape into the material if the metal or stone surface will allow it. Like other calibration services, hardness testing provides data and numerical discrepancies between samples; however, unlike machine or speedometer calibration the strength of the material cannot be quickly adjusted but rather must be reformulated or recreated.